Browse Month

July 2017

Stop dilly-dallying and pass Trump’s agenda

President Donald Trump stops to greet Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, left, and Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis. at a luncheon with GOP leadership, Wednesday, July 19, 2017, in the State Dinning Room of the White House in Washington.

By Lawrence Fedewa – – Friday, July 21, 2017

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

America has watched with growing disgust the behavior of our politicians in the debate about Obamacare. The press accounts of the continuing turmoil assert that the reasons for the discord are almost entirely political – in the worst sense of that word. According to them, the primary reason for the deadlock is each member’s own analysis of how a vote will affect his or her re-election.

If true, this charge makes a mockery of democracy and the “right to free and fair elections,” as well as the entire system which it supports. It leads to the conclusion that the entire Congress is motivated by a selfish thirst for power so the desire to win re-election outweighs any consideration of the good of the country, that is, the people whom they are sworn to serve.

Keep Reading

DC event honors veterans and those who serve in Congress

 

Saturday, July 15, 2017DC 

 

OPINION

by Lawrence Fedewa | Jul 15, 2017, 12:01 AM

[Veterans are men and women who have had to live out the consequences of political decisions, often with dire results.] (Josh Bachman/The Las Cruces Sun-News via AP)

 

The Sixth Annual Bipartisan Tribute to Veterans and Those Who Serve in Congress was held in Washington on June 27, honoring veterans of military services and especially those who have continued their service to the nation in Congress.

The program began with a presentation of the flag by the Joint Armed Forces Color Guard, the National Anthem sung by Anthony Kearns, an invocation by the Chaplain of the House of Representatives Rev. Patrick Conroy, and a Pledge of Allegiance led by Pfc. Fame Academia and Will Hubbard. Hubbard is vice president of the Student Veterans Association, serving more than 1.1 million student veterans – the largest student organization in the country.

Other dignitaries in attendance included Secretary of Veterans Affairs David Shulkin, former Virginia Governor Jim Gilmore, New Zealand Ambassador Tim Groser, Irish Deputy Chief of Mission Michael Lonergan, and many others. Shulkin’s presence underscored his commitment to work with Congress on reforming the Veterans’ administration, and the president’s pledge to make it a priority.

A long list of Congressional veterans in attendance were represented by Reps. Mike Coffman, R-Colo., and Steve Russell, R-Okla., at the podium. Coffman is the only member of Congress who served in both the Marine Corps and the Army. Russell was an Army Ranger and was part of the team that captured Saddam Hussein (Russell’s book, We Got Him, describes that episode in vivid detail).

Their remarks reflected a characteristic notable in all the speeches, what might be called a new seriousness about governing. These veterans, no matter their party allegiance, are a no-nonsense group, who have learned the importance of national policies and priorities in combat, risking their own lives and watching their comrades fall in battle.

To them, legislation is not a matter to be delayed, with decisions to be “kicked down the road” for fear of not being re-elected. These are men and women who have had to live out the consequences of political decisions, often with dire results.

The evening then honored Academia, retired Marine Cpl. Jeff DeYoung, and DeYoung’s war-dog, Cena.

Master of Ceremonies Jennifer Griffin, Fox News’ National Security Correspondent, told Academia’s extraordinary story. At 89 years old, he is a walking oral history of the World War II Japanese occupation of the Philippines. Keep Reading

The Lion Is Gone

In memoriam: James Goeser (1940-2017)

May he rest in peace

Like a lion, he searched the plains

and found a way to stake his claims.

With vision, purpose, strength and grit,

he stayed the course and never quit.

He made the village on the plain

a place to live and work and gain

a life with kids, and love and games.

 

Now the Lion sleeps, his work is done.

His quiet strength has won

his place at the Savior’s feast.

But here the village weeps.

The dawn breaks and the sky is black,

the Lion is gone and never coming back.

 

-LJF (July 5, 2017)